3-for-2 on Crime & Thriller at Kobo

Category: Books

Last week on Facebook we shared our first round of picks from the Kobo Crime Sale on this month. Are you ready for the second offense? From now through October 21st, you can get three eBooks for the price of two. Another nail in the coffin as to why autumn is the best season for crime and thriller fare!

Kobo-B3GOF-graphic2

The Tower by Simon Toyne
Buried Angels by Camilla Lackberg
The Ice Twins by S.K. Tremayne
The Chosen One by Sam Bourne
The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah
One Mile Under by Andrew Gross
The Silent Boy by Andrew Taylor
The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy

For the full sale, click here!

Do let us know which set of three you pick up either in a comment or by tweeting us @KillerReads. We’re curious to know what you’ve picked!

In conversation with Camilla Lackberg

Category: Author Post

Buried Angels, Camilla Lackberg’s eighth book in her stunning Erica Falck and Patrick Hedstrom series was published earlier this month! We were thrilled to be able to catch up with her recently to talk all about her new novel, her writing, and her very busy schedule…

Who did you grow up reading, and did they influence your writing in any way?

I was introduced to great literature when I was very young. Before I turned ten I had read most of Agatha Christie’s amazing novels and until this day she remains a great inspiration to me

Buried Angels is the eighth book in your Erica Falck and Patrick Hedstrom series. Apart from the unique cases they are instrumental in solving, Erica and Patrick are depicted as a very ordinary couple – with universal problems of how to juggle childcare and their careers, dealing with in-laws, and going through difficult times in their relationship. Why is it so important to you to portray the domestic side of life in your crime novels?

For me exploring my characters’ relationships and daily lives is a way of giving my novels more depth, another dimension. Personally, I like it when I get to know the characters when I’m reading crime fiction. It makes me feel more engaged with the story when I understand their feelings, sorrows and surroundings.

In Buried Angels, you portray a husband and wife struggling with the death of their only child, and how grief can manifest itself in different, sometimes shocking ways. Being a mother yourself, was it difficult trying to imagine how it would feel to lose a child, and the impact that it would have on your life and your relationships?

Honestly, it was very hard to write about it. When you start telling a story like this you have to face all kinds of horrible scenarios and process the darkest of emotions. Losing one of my children would be the worst thing that could ever happen to me. They mean everything and I just cannot imagine my life without them.

Even your less-than-sympathetic characters are all eventually shown to have some humanity.  They’re not stereotypes of evil or ignorance. To what extent were you drawing on people you knew growing up in Fjallbacka versus creating the characters from your imagination?

Although I might get some inspiration from people that I have met during my upbringing in Fjällbacka, my characters are totally fictional.  Adding more human sides to my less-than-sympathetic characters is very important, as it makes them more realistic. Human beings are complex creatures with both great and less-flattering characteristics.

Another issue you explore in Buried Angels is that of identity – how we become who we are, and the legacy passed down to us through the generations. The idea of the past coming to bear on the present is a recurrent theme within several of your books – what interests you most about this?

I like to study the causes and effects of different scenarios.  It’s fascinating to explore how things that happen in the past may play a role in the future.

Your books are translated into 37 languages – do you worry that anything will be lost in translation, and do you work with the translators at all?

Of course it’s always a bit scary when your books are being translated. There are so many cultural references in my novels and I know it’s a challenge to capture the essence of it all. How do you describe the small town of Fjällbacka for someone on the other side of the world without losing minor, but important, details? It’s not an easy task.

In the end you have to find great translators whom you trust, and let go of the control (which sometimes is very hard).

Do you adhere to a strict writing schedule – do you write every day?

I go into what I call ‘writing periods’ when I dedicate all of my working hours to writing. I have to have this dedicated time; otherwise I would never be able to focus.

You are a celebrity in Sweden, and spend a lot of time promoting your books at various book fairs and events – how do you cope with being a writer, a mother, and a celebrity?

It’s a puzzle! My life is rich, but other things suffer. Let’s just say I do not have the tidiest home…

Is there a crime novel that you wish that you had written? 

Any novel about Poirot or Miss Marple!

 

Buried Angels is out right now – order your copy today!

A MOTHER’S WORST NIGHTMARE!

Category: Team piece

Mother’s Day is just a couple of days away and you know us at Killer Reads, we love to put a bit of a killer spin on events such as this! So we’ve pulled together a list of books we’ve read that come under the theme of ‘A Mother’s Worst Nightmare’!

If you’ve ever felt bad for forgetting to buy a card or flowers on Mother’s day, after reading these books you can at least rest assured that compared to these fictional children you were positively angelic!

 

I have a bit of an irrational fear of identical twins. I put it entirely down to seeing The Shining at a young age, and have met a few sets of identical twins during my lifetime, always perfectly lovely people. I don’t want you think I am anti-twin. But the idea of two people being so entirely similar – some twins even share fingerprints – still kind of freaks me out. So I think the concept behind The Ice Twins, out early next year, was always going to terrify me. Sarah is the mother of identical twins, Kirstie and Lydia, faces her absolute nightmare when Lydia dies in a tragic accident. Desperate in their grief, she, her husband and their remaining little girl decide to move to his family home on a remote Scottish island to gather their strength again as a family. But right before they move, her daughter asks her why, for so many months, she’s been calling her by the wrong name. She isn’t Kirstie, but Lydia. Kirstie is the one who really died that day. Sarah doesn’t know what to do or think – is her daughter having a breakdown, or did they really bury the wrong twin? They move to the island, so remote and far away, and… well, let’s just say it’s not happy for anyone. Terrifying. Can’t wait for this one to be released…

– Katie, HarperFiction

 

083052-FC50

From the day he was born, Addison Goodheart has struck fear and loathing in the hearts of anyone who sees him. Even his own mother. Imagine looking into your baby’s eyes and feeling nothing but hatred and disgust. Imagine always fighting the urge to cast out your own child, for reasons neither you nor he can explain. It is a parent’s first instinct to protect their children, so what could be scarier than wanting to do the very opposite of that?  For that reason, Innocence by Dean Koontz makes it to the top of my list.

– Lucy, HarperFiction

063080-FC50

Psychopathic kids score pretty highly on my list of mothers’ worst nightmares. For that reason I’m picking Buried Angels by Camilla Lackberg, though I can’t say why for fear of ruining the twist! You’ll just have to read it to find out…

– Katie, HarperFiction

 

 

079279-FC50

My pick for a novel that expresses a mother’s worst nightmare is The Toy Taker by Luke Delaney, in which a series of children disappear. Not from a playground, or while staying at a friends’ house, or on a school trip, but from what should be the sanctuary of their own homes, in the middle of the night when everyone is sleeping, and the house is (supposedly) safely locked up. Just when you think your child is at their most protected turns out in this story to be when they are at their most vulnerable. The gradual revelation of how and why the perpetrator manages to achieve this without anyone hearing a sound, and without leaving any evidence, makes for a truly riveting read.

– Sarah, HarperFiction