Stephen King reviews The Night Eternal

Category: News

thenighteternalObviously we were SERIOUSLY chuffed when this landed on our desks, so for all Stephen King and Guillermo del Toro fans, we thought we’d share this with you! But as you are incredibly busy people, we thought we’d also pull out the best quote for you here:

‘This is one devilishly good read full of satisfying scares.’ 

We have one word for you. WOW. If that doesn’t make you want to read it, we don’t know what will.

The Strain trilogy opened with an authentic wow moment: a Boeing 777 arrives at JFK airport with all but four of the passengers dead in their seats. The flashlight beams of the first responders “registered dully in the dead jewels of their open eyes.” Not much later these corpses begin to rise from their morgue slabs, and a plague of blood-hungry predators overwhelms New York. The first hundred pages of The Strain is a sustained exercise in terror that held this reader in spellbound delight, because del Toro and Hogan write with crisp authenticity about both the fantastical (vampires) and the completely real (New York City, with all its odd nooks and crannies).


What began in The Strain comes to a sublimely satisfying conclusion in The Night Eternal. Del Toro and Hogan have taken Dracula, the greatest vampire tale of them all, and deftly turned it inside out. In Stoker’s novel, Bloodsucker Zero arrives in England on a sailing ship called the Demeter. As with the Regis Air 777, the Demeter is a ghost ship when it reaches port, the eponymous Count having snacked his way across the ocean. The difference is that Dracula is confronted by a heroic band of vampire-hunters who eventually drive him from England by using modern technology-everything from diaries kept on wax recording cylinders to blood transfusions. In The Strain Trilogy, the body-hopping Master-who arrives at JFK in the person of Polish nobleman Jusef Sardu-uses the very technology that defeated his honorable forebear to destroy the civilized world. Big corporations are his tools; modern transportation serves to spread the vampire virus; nuclear weapons usher in a new era of pollution and atmospheric darkness.
The Strain Trilogy comes to a rip-roaring conclusion in The Night Eternal. The action is non-stop, and the fantasy element is anchored in enough satisfying detail to make it believable. All the New York landmarks, such as Central Park’s Belvedere Castle and The Cloisters, are real. And while you’re discovering such essential vampire facts as the undead’s inability to cross running water without human help, you’ll also find out that the stone lions outside the New York Public Library have names: Patience and Fortitude. Plus, come on, admit it-there’s something about seeing vampires massing for an attack in a Wendy’s parking lot that makes them more real. The devil’s in the details, and this is one devilishly good read full of satisfying scares.

 To get your hands on a copy of The Night Eternal, simply answer this question:

In The Strain, how many passengers are left alive on the Boeing 777 flight that arrives at JFK airport at the start of the book?

Email your answer to killerreadscomp@harpercollins.co.uk to be in for a chance!

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